Wednesday, 29 August 2007

Cathedral Window Quilt Tutorial

The Cathedral Window Quilt pattern is gorgeous. The Origami-like folding of fabric, the jewel like tones of the "windows", the layers of fabric and stitching - all combine to create an amazing, complex looking quilt. The reality is that the process is not that hard, and with a little learning and patience, you can do it quite easily.


cathedral window quilt


The Cathedral Window quilt is a quilt-as-you-go project, meaning that there is no backing or quilting to be done once you have finished the quilt top. The quilt simply grows and grows as you make it, and once you've done enough squares to be satisfied, it's done. Brilliant. I am a woman of notoriously low patience, and I've taken to this quilt project with gusto and enthusiasm..... a good point for those of you out there that can't possibly believe that you'll have enough patience to make a whole quilt yourself!


First, a word about materials. Traditionally, these quilts were made predominantly from muslin, with calico or cotton scraps used for the "windows", which meant that when the quilt was held up to the light, it created that "stained glass window" effect that the quilt does so well.
Muslin, however, won't keep you warm at night, and this quilt works much easier if the base fabric you use is closely woven, keeping it's shape well during the ironing and folding process.
By all means, use muslin if you want, but make sure you buy a muslin that is closely woven if you can. My first attempt at this quilt was made with a light weight linen, and it was an unmitigated disaster. The fabric just wouldn't stay where I put it..... if in doubt, make a couple of squares and see how you go! Make sure you keep in mind that you will have to hand sew through at least four layers of your base fabric, so a light weight cotton is ideal.


This quilt works really well as a charm quilt, so any scraps of cotton prints you have lying around in your stash will be well served by this pattern.....otherwise, you can think about the design a little more if you want. This pattern calls for charm squares of about 3 1/2 inches square for the "windows". You have the option of putting a different fabric in each window, creating a pattern, or doing what I'm doing, which is alternating rows of charm squares in bright prints with rows of the plain white cotton I'm using as the backing fabric. As with all quilts, imagination and individuality reign supreme. Do what you will!

quilt fabric pile


The pattern here is for a 9 inch square, which is folded and pressed into a block which will give you a 3 inch 'window'. Four of these blocks sewn together result in a 9 inch block again, with which you will build your quilt.


Using this pattern, I have used 10 metres of white, 100% cotton broadcloth (double blocked, also known as quilters homespun) for the backing fabric. Even though my quilt is still in progress, I think this will give me a finished quilt the size of your average throw rug or lap quilt, enough to wrap around yourself, but not enough to cover the bed. A good rule of thumb is to buy fabric four times the size of the quilt you want to make. This should be more than enough to get your quilt made, and it's better to have too much fabric than not enough!
I've also used random bits of fabric from my stash, as well as about a metre of cotton batting.

white cotton - pre quilt


If you want to make a larger quilt, I would recommend increasing the size of the starter block, so your quilt yeilds larger 'windows', and making the quilt grow faster.


Anyhoo - how the hell do I make it?????


Start off by measuring out a template for your starting block. Mine is 9 inches square. A general rule of thumb is to divide the size of one edge of your starting block by a third, and that's how big one edge of the 'windows' will be.
Make your template out of medium weight card stock (like a manila folder), something that you can iron without any dramas. Do your best to ensure that the template is absolutely square.


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From your backing fabric, cut out some squares, leaving an allowance of about 2cm around the outside of the template. I recommend cutting out six squares to start, which will quilt up into a nice, rectangular shape, and if you decide you hate it by the time you're finished, you can make a cushion cover out of it.

Take one of the squares, and place the template on top of it.


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You need to mitre the corners - do this by folding each corner over the template card and ironing it down.

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The next step is the fold over the edges of the fabric, ironing them down to create mitred corners. This tucks all the raw edges inside the quilt, preventing any fraying, or raw edges in the finished piece. This is one of the steps I have devised for myself, just to achieve a neater finish. Don't freak out of your corners aren't perfectly mitred - they will be folded in again, and won't affect to finished quilt too much.

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Once the edges have been pressed, it should look like this:

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Take out the paper template, and set it to one side.
Now you take the whole fabric piece, and fold it in half lengthwise - tucking all the edges in. Press flat.
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Then fold the piece in half again, pressing flat again.

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Unfold the square, and you'll have a large square divided into quarters by creases from the pressing. This is your guide to the next step.

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Take each corner, and fold in towards the middle, keeping those pressed edges tucked in neatly. Press flat.

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Try as best you can to keep the outside corners neat - this will help the overall look of your quilt later on.

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The first fold should look like this when finished:

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Then do the same thing again - taking the outside corners, and folding them into the centre to make a smaller square - again, taking care to make the outside corners as neat as possible.

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Press flat, and put aside.
Some people recommend loosely tacking the four pieces down, but I found this hindered my progress later on, I just stack them in a pile, facing down, like this:
(sorry about the change in the light - I took the next few photos in my sewing room, where the light is not so good....)

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Repeat the steps for each of your squares.

Once you have a pile ready for sewing together, take two squares, and line up two triangles at the edges, like this:

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Now you want to sew the two triangles together along the crease at the sides, matching up the corners as well as you can. Some people hand stitch this part, but machine stitching is totally acceptable, not to mention quicker!

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Once you have stitched the triangles together, you are ready to start putting the 'window' in.
Pin down the loose triangles around the window, and flatten down the stitched together triangles, like this:

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The centre of that diamond in the middle is where the window will go. You'll need to measure that diamond shape to determine the size of the fabric for the window. On my quilt, the window is approx. 2 1/2 inches square. Make a template to the size of the window, and cut your window fabric a little larger than that, like this:

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Here, I have made another modification - because I want my quilt to be as warm as possible, I have decided to include batting in this step. Basically I just cut a sqaure of batting to the size of the window, and insert it with the window fabric, like this:

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Whether you decide to use the batting or not, is up to you - the next few steps remain the same.

Finger press the edges of the window fabric over, and place the fabric right side up on top of the diamond shaped window section of your quilt block.
Then, fold over each edge of the white backing fabric, so it 'frames' the window, pinning each side down as you go:

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Now, stitch the 'frame' down, using whatever stitch method you prefer - if you are working with light weight fabrics and no batting, you can use your favourite invisible stitching method, like blind hem stitch. I have used a simple straight stitch on top of the fabric to get through the layers of fabric and batting, plus, I like having visible stitching - it's up to you. If you want the quilting to show on the back of the quilt, make sure you sew through all the layers of fabric.

If you only want to sew through the top few layers, make sure to stitch the corners of each window down through to the back - this will help keep all the layers of fabric in place.

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Once you have stitched the 'frame' down, your quilt block should look like this:

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Once you have completed a few of these blocks, you can then start stitching them together, creating more and more 'windows' along the way. Your quilt grows and grows, with no backing or quilting needed - once you have sewn enough pieces together - the quilt is done!

cathedral window quilt

You can finish off the edges by adding in triangular shaped 'windows', or simply stitching down the 'frames' with no fabric inside - it's up to you.

Well, that's it!

I hope this tutorial gets some of you excited to make this truly satisfying project - please let me know how you go, or if you have any questions!

xxx


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 Unported License.

176 comments:

Nikki (Mother of the Devil Child) said...

Holy craperooni that's an awesome quilt!!! Thanks for the tutorial, it'll take a number and join my To-Do List

:)

kootoyoo said...

Lara, this is absolutely fantastic. I'm looking forward to giving it a go! Thank you.

Kirsty

Sisiggy said...

I'm hoping this is as easy as you make it sound because I'm really going to try this. Maybe I'll start with a pillow...a very small pillow...

Kloth & Bolt said...

Wow, this tutorial is fantastic! The photos and the easy to understand instructions are amazing! Thank you! -kb

Dawn said...

Thank you so much for the wonderful tutorial! I have been wanting to make one of these quilts but just haven't found the right tutorial to make one! Now I have found yours and I will be getting my fabrics together!
Thank you for sharing!

Kimberlee + Lies said...

leah,
you rock the casbar
this tutorial must have taken you ages, -a total labour of love. thanks mucho!!!!!!!
-KIMBERLEE

cloth.paper.string said...

amazing quilt, great tutorial. and absolutely fantastic new name, leah.
wishing you the best, sarah

Michele said...

If I had the time I'd thank you about a thousand times over! I'm currently making a cathedral window quilt for my sister and I've had the hardest time finding good, quality photos to help me out in the "how to" department so I've been doing what any respectable stitcher would do...winging it! LOL

I've been "sewing" down the edges of my 8" fabric square with "stitch witchery" and it has made the blind hemming a NIGHTMARE to get my needle through (I'm hand sewing).

I've also been sewing the cross stitch across them middle...another pain in the fanny.

Now...I'm off to my sewing room to try a few of your tips and tricks and I'm already grinning at how easy it's going to make this quilt.

Thank YOU!!
Michele

jeanetta said...

great tutorial. i have alwasy wondered what went into these quilts. i am totally inspired. now if i can just find the time. lol. maybe a square or 2 a day ...something like that.

Stella said...

Hi! Found this post via My Half of The Brain... I've seen these quilts before and assumed the construction was much more complicated than this -- I'll definitely be giving it a try one of these days. Thanks!

Bridget said...

Awesome tutorial! I've only made 2 quilts and hated almost every minute of it because I have no patience for the quilting part. Your tutorial makes this beautiful quilt look so easy and there's no quilting- hooray! I'm definately going to try this. Thank You!

ldahospud said...

FanTAStic tutorial! Great pictures and I love the quality of your work. I'll be checking back often, hoping for more!

Fiona said...

Thank you. :) I'm so tempted to go start making one now.

Whitney of lilli tutu said...

This is absolutely incredible! I want to tackle this project soon. I'm being terribly lazy though and you'll see this by my question: So the windows are hand stitched, right? Just want to make sure before I embark. Thanks!

Whitney

Péitseoga said...

wow.
i like it!
not sure if i'll ever get round to making it, all this handstitching, but it looks amazing!
do you work in rows? do you make white windows where the blocks are joined up? have you got any pictures of the finished quilt, for how the edges look?
cheers!

zoesquid said...

Thanks Leah,
I have rushed out this afternoon and bought some fabric to do this. Its in the wash right now so it will be ready to start tommorow. I will keep you posted(pictorially of course)
Cheers
Libby

Sonnja said...

Thank you so much for the wonderful tutorial!

Lind regards,

Sonnja

Vaughanville Michele said...

Oh no! Have you removed the photos from this post on purpose or is it a Flikr glitch?!! I really need them as I'm working on a CW quilt now and needed a little visual reminder. :-( Please???

Laurel said...

I just got fabric yesterday to try this quilt out. Hopefully I get my butt in gear and get it made for my parents for christmas!

Thanks for the fab tutorial. You make it look so easy!

Anna said...

love the quilt and the tutorial is awesome! i am working on it right now.. already posted two pictures on flickr! maybe you wanna check it out!
great stuff on all your pages by the way!!!!

lg
anna

Anonymous said...

My oldest daughter is obsessed with this quilt pattern. She originally had a cathedral window pillow that my greatgrandmother made, needless to say, her favorite pillow couldn't hold up. Her uncle bought her another pillow at a yard sale, and it is currently just the top, no back, no stuffing, barely any of the windows have any material. I cringe at the loss of wonderful quilting from the past, but it is the security blankie for her. She always has it when she is home, either in her hand, or very very close at hand. After 13 years of her loving these, I can finally make her one! I knew it was a lot of time involved, but never could quite figure out how to make one. Thank you!!!!

the long thread said...

I love this quilt! I'd really like to try to make this with the muslin and use for a window shade. It's on my list of projects!

Tara said...

Awesome tutorial! Great job, it's beautiful!

MARY said...

Best tutorial I've yet to see on the net. Thanks ever so much. I went right at it, but never take on a big project until I've tried it out, pillow it was. It turned out okay. The binding bothered me. I made do, but wasn't entirely happy with it. Any suggestions?

MARY said...

There it is, done! Check it out on Flicker. Not too bad for the first. I've already started on the second pillow cover. I want to check out my improved understanding (modifications to fit my pea brain) while the idea is still hot.

MARY said...

Guess I should send along my Flicker address.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/hmsklgrma/

grannytrish said...

I have been looking for a tutorial like this for years. THANK YOU. My granny made a cathederal window and it was lost after she died. I am excited about this project.

keeping_up_jones said...

So helpful...thank you. I am starting on it tomorrow, making it for my baby. I originally learned to sew the square instead of using the iron. I made on years ago and never finished it, put it in a bag to resume later and could never find it again. I finally built the nerve to start all over again. I am excited though!!

Julie Bormann said...

You have done an amazing job explaining step by step how to create this quilt. I have started with a peach background, creating windows of pinks, creams, and brown prints. I will send you a photo when it's done- thank you for helping me create this!

DoolanSis said...

Awesome. I've been trying to get up nerve to start this pattern. I'm inspired and fabric shopping tomorrow.

Roslyn Atwood said...

Great tutorial, clear & concise.
I'm bookmarking this one.

Linnea said...

I am making this quilt! I love it! Thanks for such a great Tutorial, I am really excited to try it out.

dozengrands said...

I have wanted to do one of these quilts for so many years. My ex- mother-in-law made one and it was amazing how fast it grew. At that time I was raising her grandchildren and had no desire to quilt. Now I am the grandmother and wish to make one for the oldest grandchild for her graduation, in 4 years! I had found instructions in a book for a checkbook cover. I attempted it and botched it. So I went online to look for better instructions. I stumbled on yours and it seemed easy. But yours looks nothing like the one I made. And mine is very ragged and bad looking.HELP!!!I do not understand completely how to add the piece in the middle and where to get the fabric to roll down like you did it. What do I do now? I am determined to do it right and neatly before I continue. Thanks for any tips.I have pics but don't know how to get them to you. Thanks, Betty Jo.

Hyena In Petticoats said...

Hi Betty Jo!

I'd be more than happy to help with your quilt, feel free to email me and I'll try to help!

My email address is hyena_in_petticoats(at)yahoo(dot)com(dot)au..... if you email me some pictures, I can try to tell you what to do!

Cheers,

Leah xx

Mickie Rader said...

Hi- I am an American- in the state of Kentucky. The directions and pics of the cathedral window pattern are the best I have seen anywhere!! I saved it to my favorites to use later. I had a look around your site- I think I like you lol. Aussies seem so down to earth about everything. If you get the urge to talk to an old lady quilter in the U.S. just give me a holler. catgranny54@yahoo.com, my name is Mickie. G'day (did I do that right?) lol

Maria Teresa said...

Thanks for your tutorial!!!
Maria Teresa

Catherine said...

What an absolutely fabulous tutorial. I've wanted to do one of these Cathedral Windows quilts for ages and this actually makes it sound easier than I thought it was!

Quilter In Paradise said...

just simply wonderful! thanks for sharing...
I put this on my links of tutorials - actually it inspired me to add the subject header to my blog sidebar...
I've always said "someday" to one of these quilts - with this method, "someday" might be sooner!
Beth

Samantha said...

This is GREAT! I started mine and it is coming along very nicely. I am doing the whole thing by machine, including the "windows". I probably should have done them by hand since it is sort of twisty to get the between ones done on the machine but it is turning out okay for a first try. I'll probably do this one small then make a larger one where I hand sew the "windows". Thanks for a GREAT tutorial!

TLC said...

A big thank you for taking the time to put together this tutorial! Wonderful job!

Anna M. said...

Wow! I have been a quilter for about 7 years, but I've never even heard of Cathedral Window...where have I been?! Thanks for the tutorial - you make it look so easy - I can't wait to get started!!!

Susan said...

Wow! What a great tutorial! I've been wanting to learn how to do this!

Susan
http://www.raisin-toast.com

hmsklgrma said...

Okay, I am ready to start a BIG one. My oldest grandson is getting married next year, and I want to make them a comforter. Anyone had any experience with yardage requirements for a queen size comforter?

My pillow covers came out great. I love the pattern since I can work on it in small bits and take it wherever I go.

Sonja said...

Completely brilliant!! I'm trying this one for sure, thanks a heap for posting this!

ellenkey said...

I just found your Cathedral Window tutorial. It is wonderful ! Thank you for helping the quilting world!

Ellen

El Almacén de Telas said...

Wonderful tutorial!! I've added a link to it in my blog, hope you don't mind! I just want other people to see your incredible projects!!
Congratulations!!

Patricia (from Argentina)

Window Films said...

That is so brilliant! I think this is gorgeous!

How generous of you to post a tutorial for us! Ill have to give this a go!

Cheers,
Gemma

loulee1 said...

Hi Thanks for a great tutorial, I'm adding a link to it on my blog, because I want to give credit where it is due. Thanks for the inspiration.

DARLINE said...

HI

I LOVE THE PICTURES ON HOW TO MAKE THIS QUILT IT MAKES ITS SO MUCH EASIER TO UNDERSTAND THEN JUST WORDS I HATE PATTERNS THAT ARE JUST WORDS AND NO PICTURES...THANKS SO MUCH I WANT TO MAKE ONE I LOVE MAKING NEW THINGS

Holly Nelson said...

I am just finishing sewing in the squares for an I Spy for my granddaughter. I do wish I had seen this before I started as your preparation for the squares is so much better: machine stitching the squares together (I did everything by hand..ugh) and ironing the corners down. If I ever do another...
Holly

Becky said...

Thank you thank you! I've been wanting to make this quilt! I'm so happy you posted this!

Kacie said...

Thanks for this! I had never considered making this quilt before, but a friend asked about it and, after finding your tutorial and seeing clear directions on how to do it, I think I might try it! Thanks again for the great tutorial.

Carol said...

This is a super tutorial! Saved my project from being mundane and irritating. The construction techniques are very elegant! Please see my work in progress (a padded cathedral window pillow) at flickr; my handle is bearspaw55. I'm too new to know how to make a link, etc. If you would like to know what did or didn't work, please e-mail me at bearspaw55@yahoo.com. Thanks, Petticoats!

laurie in maine said...

"Anyhoo - how the hell do I make it?????" should be the standard opening caption for all How-to's :) I so want to start this - screw my resolutions!!

Anonymous said...

Hi, I just wanted to congratulate you on a great tutorial. I have been searching the web for this pattern. It is now in my favorites. Thankyou. ---Krystal

Anonymous said...

My wonderful mother-in-law made this quilt for my daughter. On the back side of the quilt, she wrote in pencil (then "embroidered" with a back stitch)- "if you ever want to know how much Grandma loves you, count each stitch. One's a hug, the other's a kiss". Grandma died when my little girl was nine, but she left such a precious gift behind. I think of her everyday.

Forever Foster said...

Thankyou so much for this wonderful tutorial. A Cathedral Window quilt has just shot to the top of my 'Must Do' list!
-Lissa.

Anonymous said...

Hi,
I am new to sewing and quilting and this is amazing. What is the exact fabric you used? You mentioned that you doubled it over? Also, when hand stitching the part of the window that is folded over, where do you hide the knots? Thank you!!!

Buckleigh at hot mail dot com said...

I was looking through the posts and didn't see an answer asked by someone else: I'm looking to make a queen-size topper of this; prolly 12" squares of the white blocks. Can anyone give me an estimate of yardage? Also, I was thinking of doing blanket stitch on the curved pieces or some other embroidery stitch....

Cheryl said...

Wanted to say THANK YOU so very much! Have purchased a pamplet on this quilt many years ago and still didn't quite understand. This is perfect have made for of the squares together and it is so easy and nice. Did have a question can you do this on the sewing machine? Or are you not suppose to see the design on the back. I did mine on the sewing machine makes the design on the back not sure if that is suppose to look that way? Thanks again for your tutorial it is marvelous, and to let you know I got the link off the Ebay from another user. Cheryl

quiltsbylee said...

Found this link on www.fabricsnquilts.net. She has some great links there.

Was wondering how a good quality flannel would work for this. Has anyone tried it with flannel?

Anonymous said...

Thank you, thank you, thank you! What a beautiful quilt, and great details to get me motivated.

Regina said...

wow I just stumbled on this, I have a quilt just like this on my bed. I bought it on e-bay over 8 years ago. I have never know what it was called or why it wasn't really quilted or had any batting in the middle. NOW I KNOW wow thanks I think I want to make a matching one for my daughters bed now1

Anonymous said...

Beautiful quilt. What great detailed instructions with wonderful photos. Thank you for sharing your knowledge!!!

Amy (lilme2_99) said...

THANK YOU for this amazingly easy tutorial to follow! I had bookmarked it some time ago, but came across it yesterday while bumming about. I was bored yesterday and instantly inspired after viewing this tutorial. I was off and whipped out a few sample blocks. I LOVE IT! I have intentions of making a larger scale quilt but want to think about the layout a bit to decide if I'll go completely random-scrappy or some-what controlled-scrappy! Here is my little sample: Amy's Cathedral Windows wall-hanging.
Thanks again for the wonderful tutorial!!!

Amy (lilme2_99) said...

THANK YOU for this amazingly easy tutorial to follow! I had bookmarked it some time ago, but came across it yesterday while bumming about. I was bored yesterday and instantly inspired after viewing this tutorial. I was off and whipped out a few sample blocks. I LOVE IT! I have intentions of making a larger scale quilt but want to think about the layout a bit to decide if I'll go completely random-scrappy or some-what controlled-scrappy! Here is my little sample: Amy's Cathedral Windows wall-hanging.
Thanks again for the wonderful tutorial!!!
-Amy
Amy's Passions

Anonymous said...

Thank you for the pattern, it was very helpful once I read through it. First I just scanned it and looked at the great pictures, but missed the second folding info. You should really read through the instructions because they are very helpful

towardsthelight said...

I thank you from the bottom of my heart! I too have been searching for an understandable instruction for this beautiful craft. My Grandmother's made these but it wasn't one of the forms of quilting my Mother did and the art became lost in my family. I have purchased quilting books in the past because they had some information about this quilt, but never found a tutorial I thought I could actually follow until you blessed us with this one! Thank you again!
Cheryl

lemonlimepie said...

Wow! I saw a pillow cover with cathedral windows on Etsy, which I fell in love with. I kept wondering how in the world they created it, and thanks to you, the mystery has been revealed. What a great tutorial - makes me think that a non-quilter like myself could actually make this.
Thanks. (I found you via thelongthread)

apple cyder said...

looks like you are inspiring a whole lot of people (including me) to make this great quilt pattern. thank you so much!

louisesews said...

Thank you for this tutorial - it's so rare to find one that makes me go "I get it!" on the first reading.
I've wanted to have a go at Cathedral Windows for ages, but have never had the confidence - but I made a small two-block pincushion using the tutorial as a guide, and it looks fab. Already thinking about a quilt using this technique. Thanks again!

Marie_Christine said...

I just love this!

Not that I don't have enough projects =O) but I have to give this a try!

Thanks for posting it

JVC_Scout_Mom said...

Someone asked yardage ...

1 yd of muslin cut into 9-inch squares, yields 16 3-inch windows (using 2.5 inch 'centers')

So ... 1 yard of fabric (36 x 42) = about 15 in x 16 in square.

From there you can figure out the rest of the math. ;)

Kathy and Larry Humann said...

We just had a quilt guild member demo this on Tuesday night and now I want to make one! I found our tutorial and I like the way you make yours better than her method. She actually used the sewing machine to make a sort of envelope...anyway, not as much pressing and folding, but I like the look of this better. More oragami like...She also didnt use batting and I think I would like that. If Im going to go to the trouble to make one, I sure want it to be as nice as possible! Thanks!

jacttd said...

I just finished a mini quilt using your tutorial. It's literally one of the easiest quilts I've made over my 15 yrs of quilting. The only thing I'd like to improve are the corners (or points) between the panes. I did tack down the points before adding the panes because I was working from memory rather than printing out the directions to take down to my studio. Any suggestions to neaten this up other than to try one without tacking those down?

Great tutorial writing, clear pictures. Please keep them coming!

Nicole said...

I have admired these types of quilts for a long time but I just assumed it was incredibly difficult! I cannot wait to try it now! Thanks so much for putting this tutorial together!

Sophia Aster said...

Thank you for this tutorial! I used it to make a cathedral window quilt sampler this past weekend and it was the most satisfying quilting I've done in a long time. Just a few steps and the results are amazing!

Rachael Rabbit said...

I've just found you ... love the tutorial!

Anonymous said...

Have you ever considered submitting this to THREADS magazine? I love your tutorial and would like as many people to see it as possible. Thanks so much for your posting.
Elaine, SF, CA

Bethany said...

Thank you for the great tutorial! I have started to making mine. Ironing isn't as much fun as it should be, but I keep seeing your beautiful quilt and thinking I will have one soon. Do you have a shot of the full quilt? I'd love to see the whole thing. Thanks again.

Anonymous said...

Wow, truly beautiful! Thanks for the tutorial!

Jenn said...

this is an awesome tutorial! I've seen it done other ways, but I love the idea of putting squares of batting inside to make it even warmer. I'll have to try that next time I made a cathedral window! I'm certainly going to try your method - looks fast and fun!

Mary Newman said...

Very fun and amazing! I just started last night...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/midnamoondog/3761967499/

KT said...

Thank you so much for this tutorial! Cathedral window quilts look so pretty so I'd love to make one. But I'm starting small, with a pin cushion, and your tutorial is proving incredibly helpful.

Ann said...

Thank goodness I found your site! I've been trying to teach myself how to make the cathedral window for a month...just couldn't get it right! Your tutorial makes it so much easier to understand. Can't wait to try again. Ann C.

Elizabeth said...

Thanks for the great tutorial! I've been wanting to try Cathedral Windows, and your instructions are very clear. I can't wait to give it a shot! :)

Anonymous said...

Thank you so much for this amazing tutorial on this quilt. I searched google for a pattern and this came up! You made it so simple to follow with the pictures and detailed explanations. I can't thank you enough! I am making this quilt for my parents in a beautiful Blue and Creamy White. Thank you Thank you Thank you!

Deborah

Christine said...

Wow, I had no idea this type of quilt is so simple! I always shy away from making quilts because of the piecing it all together part at the end...I get so frustrated with putting the front to the back. Thank you so much for this awesome tutorial!!

Heather said...

This is by far the best tutorial I've ever read. Thank you so much. I've wanted to tackle a CW quilt for a while, but never felt confident. Now you've helped me get there! I'm going to do it with the fabric from my kids baby clothes as the "glass"...can't wait. Thanks again!

Maggie said...

Thanks so much for the tutorial! I couldn't have made my quilt without you!!!!

Anonymous said...

ah ha. now I understand how it's made. Thanks you for explaining.

Kris said...

I am a nurse and I had a patient show me how to make this. She showed me over a decade ago. She was so precious and I have never forgotten her. I still have the square she gave me for a pattern. I have tried to make a quilt several time but it was so time consuming. With your tutorial I can do it! Thanks for taking the time to share!

Shelley said...

Thank you so much- I started with another tutorial and couldn't figure out what I was doing wrong. Your tutorial made it all crystal clear!

Anonymous said...

Thank you so much for this wonderful pattern, and great pictures. A friend and I took a class on this, but it was all hand stitched and she has hand problems and couldn't do it, but wanted a table runner with the pattern. I am surprising her with it for Christmas, and am sooooo thankful to find that I can do a lot without hand stitching. I have the squares cut out and about 1/3 folded and pressed. I can't wait to get it done. Thanks again. Luci

yngla said...

Great tutorial, awesome quilt!

Denisehyeong said...

Thanks so much for your tutorial! I followed it to make a "mini" quilt to try out the technique. I loved it, and plan on making a lap sized one now! http://home-and-garden.webshots.com/photo/2274867340055807182pTylBg

VictorianCobweb said...

I have been searching for this pattern off and on for a number of years. I remember helping my granmother make one of these years ago. Great blog, thank you.

Linda Starr said...

Wow, this is the method my grandmother tried to show me when I was twelve and I didn't have the patience to learn, now I work in ceramics and I made a bowl with this pattern loosely adapted. Thanks so much for the info.

Anonymous said...

Great photo's and simple instructions for someone who has never quilted before. Thank you for your time and effort on this!

katrin said...

Thanks a lot for this great tutorial!!! I have started to do such a quilt now too :) greetings

Lesley Richardson said...

I just want you to know your video has made an absolutely unbelievable difference to the process I'm using to put a cathedral window quilt together. I'm making a queen-size quilt. Your process is going to save me hundreds of hours as I was as slow as a slug putting each square together the old way.
Thank you, very, very much.
Lesley

Anonymous said...

This is great! I'm so glad I found this. Your tuturial and pictures with each step have proved very helpful and inspiring. In fact, I've never sewn anything before (other than a button here or there) until I saw this. I went out and bought a sewing machine just for this project. I cut a few corners and as a result, mine is not quite the same, but I'm in a time crunch. Trying to finish it up for a friend's Christmas gift. So far, it's looking pretty nice. Not bad for my first try at sewing! The next one I make, I will follow all the instructions (I got tired of folding and ironing so I skipped one folding step so I don't have the the white window edging you do but my version is still nice to look at, I think.). I think this might be my new favorite craft to give as gifts! :)

Anonymous said...

Having made all of our clothes back in the double knit era, I have a lot still stored in my closets. I feel that this will make a great non-raveling window filler and will add to the warmth. Also, a lot of memories will spring forth as each window is opened.

Anonymous said...

Great pics! How easy is this! I found that I could eliminate the first folding of the raw edges and just cut the fabric a perfect 9" square. When I finished, I added triangles around the edge windows and then added Prairie Points to the edge of them by turning the raw edges of the points under and top stitching. ---------Becky

madamerogers said...

oh my! AMAZING! what a fab tutorial! Another thing to add to my list os UFO's.....hopefully the simplicity of your tutorial will inspire me to finish!

JBurgess68 said...

I had a customer inquire about turning her kids saved clothes into a Cathedral Window quilt. Since it reminded me of a Double Wedding Ring I thought it can't be that much different WRONG! I have an Encyclopedia of Classic Quilt Patterns...after reading those directions, I considered calling her and saying pick a different pattern but then I took a quick look on the web. There you were! The instructions & pictures are great. I'll probably make the "windows" bigger but this is definitely looking like a project I can handle. THANK YOU! a thousand times THANK YOU!Jenn(A Quilt Top, Pine, CO)

Mary said...

Great tutorial!

TJ and Whitnee said...

What a beautiful quilt with a great tutorial! I'd love to share a link to this tutorial on sewwhattoday.blogspot.com on February 7!

Anonymous said...

What a wonderful tutorial, I am very new to quilting and you have inspired me to make one of these, I have spent the day cutting out and folding the squares ready to assemble them tomorrow.
Thank you so much for your easy to follow instructions.

Annie@Imagination said...

Thank you -- what a great tutorial -- adding it to the list of need to at least try :) thank you!

Sandra said...

What a great tutorial! I'm currently finishing up several projects, but will add this to my list of "must do's". Thanks for sharing!

Melissa said...

Thank you sooooo much for this Blog!!
My grandmother passed away 5 years ago and she left me all her knitting supplies and a Cathedral Quilt that she had started in 1976 (she had to stop due to carpel tunnel problems). Your Blog has helped me to see how the quilt is actually made, so that I can finish it. My 9 year-old daughter is helping too!

Melissa

Lynz said...

I followed a link here to your tutorial - thank you!!! The tute itself is amazing but your whole blog is an inspiration. I may be here for some hours....

SewBuzy said...

My best friend's grandmother passed away recently and the family gave me alot of her sewing things. Among the treasures was an unfinished Cathedral Window Quilt ( about the size of a table runner). I have looked at it and studied it and just couldn't figure it out. Thank you so much for the great tute. I can now see how its done.

Kimberly said...

Oh awesome... I'm so glad I found this tutorial! This is going to be my summer project. I cannot wait! Thank you for such a thorough explanation.

Anonymous said...

I just sewed in my very first "window" using your tutorial. It was awesome and I am looking forward to completing a quilt this year. I have shared your site with my quilting guild buddies and they were all very excited. One thing that made the pressing easier was to mist the fabric first. Thanks so much for you time and tutoring. Janet

Sew_Belfast said...

I just made my first "window" too! And I love how quickly this goes....so excited to make baby versions for my new nieces & nephews! Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!

Heather in Australia said...

Thank you so very much for such a fantastic tutorial!! I have been itching (or is that "stitching) to try a cathedral window block but have been too scarded to date! My friend and fellow quilter put me onto your blog and now I am truly excited!
No doubt it will be on my to-do list for a short time, but much much sooner than I ever thought it would!
thanks many times over!

Michelle said...

Wow... quilting intimidates me so much, but this actually seems doable! Thanks for the fantastic tutorial, I think I have my next project!

Tray Guy said...

I'm using the pattern to be framed into a tea tray, therefore it is only about 3x4 squares, but still this would have been incredibly difficult without the help of your tutorial. Thank you.

Gabriela said...

I love your tutorial....this pattern is a favorite of mine and I have done many quilts with a twist...(colorwise)
I taught myself how to do it so I do it differently but I love the ides of sewing them to each other by machine!I will have to try that next!
http://www.threadheadsanonymous.blogspot.com
Gabriela

M.McCafferty said...

This is so great! I've been wanting to learn how to make these for so long, but I thought it was going to be way to hard. This tutorial makes it so easy to understand. Thank you so much! I'm new to this whole blog thing, and in just a week of blogging I've learned so much.

Kalei said...

I know I am just echoing the rest of the commenters when I say what a lovely tutorial. I started this the very moment I saw it, and further more must add that as a visual learner I am extremely thankful for your very "easy to follow" photos. I don't even think I read most of the tut...(sorry) I really am visual.

Making a wedding gift for a family member, hope it turns out half as beautiful as yours.

Mahalo Nui Loa (thank you very much in hawaiian)

Megan said...

I have two Dream On charm packs and 2 Bella Solid layer cakes in my stash to make this with...I'm so excited I can hardly stand it, LOL.

hoyoyi said...

Hi dear,

I have started my first trial base on your tutorial ^ ^ Learnt a lot in the process. It is not easy, but I will keep working on it~

Parissa said...

wow! Ive always thought this would be really really really redonkulously hard to do..but to my amazement.. Its as simple as popping a pimple.

Thank you:)

Anonymous said...

Thank you soooooo much. You have made my day, week, month to teach me how to do this! Thank you again!

Anonymous said...

I made this quilt for my 89 year old Mother. This is her favorite pattern. She has helped sew many quilts in her lifetime but never had a quilt of her own. She is tickled with this quilt and shows all of her friends her pride and joy. Thank you for your pattern which enabled me to make my Mom's dream come true.

Rae-Landa said...

Thank you for this, I saw this pattern and it sparked some creavite juices.
I'll add this to my list of to-do's

Kelly said...

Thank you so much! You have done such a wonderful job with the step by step directions. What a beautiful quilt. I am excited to try it!

Nancy said...

Thank you so much for these instructions. They are fantastic. My mother-in-law made one of these quilts and I have been looking for the name of the quilt and how to do it. I watched her several years ago, but could not remember how it was done. She made a beautiful full-size quilt. Thank you again so much for the good directions. I'll let you know how it turns out.

EJ said...

I have seen these on several blogs and always thought it was way too hard for me to do. But I just made my first one using your tutorial and it's awesome. I am SO excited!! Thank you, thank you, thank you!

Anonymous said...

Woman, you are my new hero! Thank you for making an easy to follow tutorial!! :D I looked at a couple others and decided cathedral windows were too complicated. But after seeing yours, I'm going to give it a try! Thank you!!

Anonymous said...

I've had this bookmarked for a couple years now. I love the look of the finished quilt, but could never wrap my brain around it. Thanks so much for taking the pictures and (keeping it here!) so I can come drool.

One day, I might actually start one!

~Shannon

Nita said...

This is a great tute! i hope you don't mind as I have put a link to this on my blog where I have done a 'Secret Garden' tutorial.

DEE in MI said...

THANK YOU!
I have been wanting to make this quilt for ages but just couldn't quite figure it out! With these instructions IT IS super simply. I am starting on my quilt tomorrow! LOVE IT.

DEE in MI

Tara said...

Do you have to hand stitch in the colored pieces? I don't know how to hand stitch and that is what is holding me back.

Anonymous said...

Oh my, you make this look so easy. I haven't pieced a quilt top in a long time. I've been using the printed (cheater) tops. This is one top I'll make. Thank you.

Anonymous said...

hi thanks so much! I'm glad I found the tutorial--now must find a bunch of white fabric to make this. The other great thing about this is that I have a lot of left over batting so this is a great way of getting rid of it. I want to make something like this for my Grandma. :)
Thanks again,
Laura

Susan said...

I am definately going to try this. Been wanting to make one of these for years but it looked so complicated. Your tutorial makes it seems so much easier and the instructions are easy to understand and most of all the pictures are GREAT as they show everything step by step. I am the type of person that would need the book entitled "Quilting for Dummies" but your step by step instructions seem to be incredibly easy to follw. I will definately try this now!! Thank you for the easy to follow tutorial.

rho said...

You SEW Rock!!!

dotty said...

Made this 25 years ago and loved it. Gifted to my first Granddaughter. Lost the pattern and couldn't believe my sister found it for me. Now making another one just to keep my hands busy. I do not use a sewing machine. It is so much fun doing this while watching TV. Thank you!

Sandra said...

Thanks so much for the tutorial. I was lucky enough to inherit a partially completed one, just enough to be beautiful on a quilt rack, and all the material needed to finish to the full size the original quilter intended, but did not know the name or how to finish. Thanks again!

Anonymous said...

Thanks so much for the tutorial-it was very straight forward and the best one I've seen. I'm definitely going to try to make one. I love how whenever you want to stop-you can, and it's done-no real, finishing to do. :) -Sandy

crazybaglady said...

My grandmother used to make the window pane quilts. I will inherit the original. It has pieces of my great grandfather's ties and other memorable fabrics! I believe she made a total of 5 king size window pane quilts.

GenWen said...

You made it as easy as peas. Thank you! :-)

patriciaarra said...

Muchisimas gracias por el tutoria,ahora sí que lo voy a hacer,ya que esta muy bien explicado.Gracias te sigo para poder aprender mas cosas de Patchwork.Patricia de Paraguay

Kate said...

I was just given a Cathedral Window quilt that my mother was working on at the time of her death 23 years ago. I could not find any instructions with the quilt but found your tutorial and although I have never quilted before you have given me the confidence to finish what my mother started and a beautiful memento of her life.

Pam said...

What a wonderful tutorial. When I first saw the cathedral windows pattern, it was love at first sight. However, I've never completed more than a Christmas ornament. Maybe now, using your hints, I'll finally make a pillow or coverlet! Thanks so much.

Sarah said...

I LOVE your tutorial!!! I have made several quilts using your pattern. Thank you for making this entry. i have passed your link along to many people.

Eve said...

This is going to be my daughter's hope chest quilt-Thanks for the tutorial in pics :)

Pratima Kapoor said...

Hi
I am from India and stumbled upon your blog by chance while surfing for quilting projects and am sooooo happy to see your tutorial. What a beautiful quilt and equaly beautifully written tutorial. I would definately like to give it a try. its in my "Must di" list.
Many thanks again.

Make handmade said...

Great tutorial, i love it very much. Thanks for sharing...

HilaryT said...

Found your excellent tutorial the week after having seen Cathedral Window quilt in Coventry (UK) mde by two sisters at the beginning of the 20th century. Each "light" was different because they had access to dress materials including Liberty prints. You've inspired me to imitate them!

Itsdjoy said...

Love it ...I have 5" charm pack been searching around for a toutorial and I believe I've found it lol... I was wondering how I was going to add the batting ... Thanks in advance GREAT PIC

Anonymous said...

Saw this on TV and it didn't make any sense. Found you on line and Now I can make this beautiful quilt. Your explanation made all the difference. The pictures were clear. Thank you

Angela said...

I have made a Cathedral Window baby quilt using solid pink flannel for the big squares and white flannel with small multi-colored dots for the small squares. I sewed the entire thing by hand . . . it was an awesome project.

One thing I would like to point out about your tutorial is the step where you said, "You need to mitre the corners . . ." I so wish the instructions I followed had this step. It would have been so much EASIER!!!

Thanks!

Anonymous said...

have been looking for an easy tutorial.. had a class on this about 2 years ago but was totally confussed. your tutorial is very easy to understand and i took notice you didn't fold the inital square in half and sew it first instead you creased everything.. can't wait to try this new method . thanks for taking the time to help us out... Helen

Buy Runescape Gold said...

Found the superb training a few days after you have observed Cathedral Eye-port quilt inside Coventry (British isles) mde by 2 siblings at the outset of the twentieth millennium. Every "light" ended up being various simply because they experienced entry to costume supplies which includes Freedom designs. You might have motivated us to imitate them!

Timmerman's Place said...

My mother-in-law, who is 88, makes a CW quilt for each grandchild when they get married. She has now made eight and they are each beautiful.

Mindy said...

Thank you so much for this tutorial. I never realized how simple a construction it was. Been making so many fussy cut quilts, this will be a break from the math.

Will be happily going through my fabbies today!

Anonymous said...

My grandmother made a couple of these quilts, and I have always wanted to do it, too. She filled the windows with scraps left from the many dresses she made for her 20-odd granddaughters over the years.

Teresa Pendino said...

Congrats for a wonderful tut! Well done! You know for sure when it travels through time as yours is. :) I have also posted your link for others to have the confidence of knowing they can do this thanks to you. I hope you don't mind. Here is the link where yours is posted: http://galleryofquilts.blogspot.com/ I too have one in progress in which I owe the gratitude to you!

TT said...

oh my goodness, i have read instructions in books and in magazines and couldn't figure it out. I have a friend in the quilt word that told me she would teach me how, we just can never find the time to get down to business. I read your tutorial and printed it out and went to work in my sewing/quilting room and OMG how easy is this!!!!!! thank you so much. You did a wonderful job with the instructions and pictures. Than you again.

La la Lisa said...

What a wonderfully clear tutorial. Thank you so much for sharing what i always thought was such a difficult form of quilting. I have already had ago, following your method and have to say, i was extremely pleased with my first attempt. If i could have worked out how, i would have added a pic to show you. This has now been added to my EVER growing list of favorite methods and i now have more projects to add to my equally long list off projects.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for this wonderful, sewer-freindy tutorial! I inherited a cathedral quilt from my grandmother and ever since I began quilting, I've wanted to know how to make one myself - now I do!!

Septiembre said...

Muchas gracias. Me ha sido de mucha ayuda.

Tanyia said...

omg I can not thank you enough for this tut. I am semi new to quilting and this is the most amazing quilt but the look is so intimidating! I think I may be able to manage this now because of you! ty ty ty!

Beth Gracie said...

oh my gosh thanks! i've been researching cathedral tutorials and this is the best one by far! now i'm not so intimidated. can't wait to start. thx!!!

Thelocallovely said...

This is sooooo great!!! Thanks for sharing I looove it!!

Thelocallovely said...

Looove it!!! Thanks soooo much for sharing!!

Thelocallovely said...

Loooove it!!! Thanks soooo much for sharing!

Senne Sational said...

dear goodness!

not only did i unknowingly use one of the photos from this blog entry as my facebook cover this summer, but now that i am seeking instructions on how to make the quilt, i am even more happy to find how detailed and thorough you have been : )

many thanks and flowers,
Beth

Anonymous said...

To give your quilt a "puffy", look cotton balls can be used instead of batting. Just place the cotton ball under the window before stitching.

Francine Johnson McGee said...

This is the clearest cathedral window I have ever seen -- inxluding a book. You have made this favorite, hithertoo unfathomable pattern doable! Thanks!

Melissa said...

Absolutely Wonderful!! Can this be sewed on a machine?